Grass Fed by Lexicon

RWC Grass fed | 'Grass fed' means exactly what it sounds like, the animal ate grass or other similar naturally growing plants around them. Organic and grass fed aren’t the same thing. You can have organic meat without it being grass fed, meaning the animal could have been raised on organic wheat or corn. Always look for grass-fed and enjoy benefits such as:

  • Better fat quality
  • Vitamin K2 (Bone and heart health)
  • More antioxidants
Grass-fed also means you are protecting our water ways. The crops grown to feed most cattle are subject to fertilisers and manure which run off into our lakes and rivers, killing wildlife and poisioning our rivers / lakes making it unfit for human consumption.

Grass Fed by Lexicon

RWC Grass fed | 'Grass fed' means exactly what it sounds like, the animal ate grass or other similar naturally growing plants around them. Organic and grass fed aren’t the same thing. You can have organic meat without it being grass fed, meaning the animal could have been raised on organic wheat or corn. Always look for grass-fed and enjoy benefits such as:

  • Better fat quality
  • Vitamin K2 (Bone and heart health)
  • More antioxidants
Grass-fed also means you are protecting our water ways. The crops grown to feed most cattle are subject to fertilisers and manure which run off into our lakes and rivers, killing wildlife and poisioning our rivers / lakes making it unfit for human consumption.
  • GRASS FED TERMS

Most cattle are finished on industrial feedlots, where they are fed a mix of antibiotics, hormones, protein supplements and corn. Farmers like Joel Salatin of Polyface Farms in Swoope, Virginia raise their cattle on grass, using rotational grazing and other fundamental principles of pasture management. Learn more about the difference between grassfed and cornfed beef.

"Grass Farmer" Joel Salatin Polyface Farm Swoope, Virginia Joel Salatin is a farmer in Virginia's Shenandoah Valley.

A third generation alternative farmer, he returned to the farm full-time in 1982 and continued refining and adding to his parents' ideas. A sought-after conference speaker, he addresses a wide range of issues, from "creating the farm your children will want" to "making a white collar salary from a pleasant life in the country."

Grass farmer -- "Grass is a solar collector. It uses photosynthesis to transform the sun's rays into chlorophyll. When cows eat grass, they convert this energy into protein and fat." -LOCAL: The New Face of Food and Farming in America, by Douglas Gayeton

Grass fed -- Grass and forage shall be the feed source consumed for the lifetime of the ruminant animal, with the exception of milk consumed prior to weaning. -USDA, Agricultural Marketing Service

Carbon sequestration -- "Excessive carbon in our atmosphere is considered a major contributor to climate change, so practices that remove carbon from the air and capture it in the soil are increasingly in vogue among progressive farmers." -LOCAL: The New Face of Food and Farming in America, by Douglas Gayeton Rotational grazing --

"Rotational grazing is periodically moving livestock to fresh paddocks, to allow pastures to regrow. Rotational grazing requires skillful decisions and close monitoring of their consequences. Modern electric fencing and innovative water-delivery devices are important tools. Feed costs decline and animal health improves when animals harvest their own feed in a well-managed rotational grazing system." -The National Sustainable Agriculture Information Service

  • GRASS FED TERMS

Most cattle are finished on industrial feedlots, where they are fed a mix of antibiotics, hormones, protein supplements and corn. Farmers like Joel Salatin of Polyface Farms in Swoope, Virginia raise their cattle on grass, using rotational grazing and other fundamental principles of pasture management. Learn more about the difference between grassfed and cornfed beef.

"Grass Farmer" Joel Salatin Polyface Farm Swoope, Virginia Joel Salatin is a farmer in Virginia's Shenandoah Valley.

A third generation alternative farmer, he returned to the farm full-time in 1982 and continued refining and adding to his parents' ideas. A sought-after conference speaker, he addresses a wide range of issues, from "creating the farm your children will want" to "making a white collar salary from a pleasant life in the country."

Grass farmer -- "Grass is a solar collector. It uses photosynthesis to transform the sun's rays into chlorophyll. When cows eat grass, they convert this energy into protein and fat." -LOCAL: The New Face of Food and Farming in America, by Douglas Gayeton

Grass fed -- Grass and forage shall be the feed source consumed for the lifetime of the ruminant animal, with the exception of milk consumed prior to weaning. -USDA, Agricultural Marketing Service

Carbon sequestration -- "Excessive carbon in our atmosphere is considered a major contributor to climate change, so practices that remove carbon from the air and capture it in the soil are increasingly in vogue among progressive farmers." -LOCAL: The New Face of Food and Farming in America, by Douglas Gayeton Rotational grazing --

"Rotational grazing is periodically moving livestock to fresh paddocks, to allow pastures to regrow. Rotational grazing requires skillful decisions and close monitoring of their consequences. Modern electric fencing and innovative water-delivery devices are important tools. Feed costs decline and animal health improves when animals harvest their own feed in a well-managed rotational grazing system." -The National Sustainable Agriculture Information Service

RWC Environment | The environment is an issue close to RWC’s heart. We have one place to live, so everything we do we ensure is sustainable and kind to our planet. Put bluntly, humans are destroying the Earth. The global population grew and along with it the consumption habits of humans.

With increased agriculture and the burning of fossil fuels we have put dangerous amounts of CO2 in the atmosphere, causing the Earth to slowly heat up. The implications of this can be seen today with the melting of the polar icecaps, dying coral reefs, dangerous new weather patterns and the extinction of plant and animal species. It’s not all doom and gloom, we can reverse some of the damage and prevent further harm if we all start tp make our own changes .  

Clean energy schemes are on he rise around the world with many countries aiming to be 100% carbon neautral with in a matter of years. Traditional farming tehniques and grass lands are also becoming favoured, loweing emmissions contributed by modern agriculture and allowing the land to develop and mature naturally. The introduction of hybrid and electric vehicals along with many cities imposing congeston charges, low emmision zones and restriced driving regulations, is helping reduce exhaust pollution and revolutionising the motor industry.

Climate Change 101 with Bill Nye | Nat Geo

Climate Change 101 with Bill Nye | Nat Geo

RWC Environment | The environment is an issue close to RWC’s heart. We have one place to live, so everything we do we ensure is sustainable and kind to our planet. Put bluntly, humans are destroying the Earth. The global population grew and along with it the consumption habits of humans.

With increased agriculture and the burning of fossil fuels we have put dangerous amounts of CO2 in the atmosphere, causing the Earth to slowly heat up. The implications of this can be seen today with the melting of the polar icecaps, dying coral reefs, dangerous new weather patterns and the extinction of plant and animal species. It’s not all doom and gloom! The world is taking action to some degree.

More and more clean energy schemes are being seen around the world with countries aiming to become 100% carbon neutral in years to come. A return to grass lands and farming techniques of yesteryear are reappearing, lowering total emissions contributed by agriculture. Transportation is even turning green via electric cars powered by lithium batteries.